DARESHACK X TRIPLE CO ROAST

TRIPLE DARE

One of the first and most essential of our projects. We wanted a finely crafted product tailored to be the espresso that we can drink every day, 24/7 and never get bored of.

Triple Co Roast was the obvious choice for this collaboration because of its attention to detail and intricate roasting methods. We wanted a blend that was really something for everyone; this doesn’t mean a blend that’s inoffensive and middle-of-the-road. Triple Dare is boldly something for everyone, with big full-bodied chocolate sweetness from Brazil, red berry-like acidity and caramel from Colombia, along with a candy floral sweet (yet subtle) note from Ethiopia. Tastes great with or without milk. Day or night (unless you like sleep).

The components of the blend change in line with the fresh coffee crop each year, but the flavour profile remains the same.

Current blend components

Country: Brazil

Who: Farm SAN ANTONIO
Region: SÃO PAULO
Varietal: ACAIA
Altitude: 1300m
Process: NATURAL
In the batch: 60 %

Country: Colombia

Who: JOSE GOMÉZ
Region: NARIÑO
Varietal: CATURRA
Altitude: 1860m
Process: FULLY WASHED
In the batch: 20 %

Country: Ethiopia

Who: ISRAEL DEGFA
Region: OROMIA
Varietal: MUNDO NOVO
Altitude: 1950M
Process: NATURAL
In the batch: 20 %

Triple Dare Brewing Methods

Whether you like it black, white, filter or espresso; we've covered the main brewing techniques below and think we've come up with great go-to recipes to get the best cup possible. Get ready for some tasty coffee!

Recipe
Dose: 18g
Time: 30 – 34s
Yield: 37g

You will need
– Espresso machine
– Scales (preferable, but not essential)
– Filtered water (preferable, but not essential)
– Triple Dare coffee!

Method
We have carefully curated our espresso recipe for Triple Dare to bring out the best from each component within the blend. Balanced, full bodied, chocolatey, caramel with a fruity edge. This is a coffee to drink every day; morning, noon or night. Black or white. Short or long. Hot or iced.

  1. Start by filling your portafilter with 18g of Triple Dare. This can be done by eye but is not as accurate! It is approximately 3.5tbsp ground coffee.
  2. Knock the portafilter (like a karate chop) to even out the grounds – this helps for an even extraction – we don’t want any heaps, mounds or clumps of coffee. Now tamp down with a nice even pressure.
  3. Place the portafilter into your espresso machine and start your extraction along with your timer! (Unless your machine has a built in one) If you want to be really fancy you can place scales underneath your cup. Then stop the extraction to aim for 40g yield. This should be somewhere between 30 – 34s. If you have ground the coffee yourself, remember – if you’ve got 37g yield too quickly, you need to grind finer! – If it’s taking too long to get to 37g – grind coarser! If we’ve ground it for you – it should be spot on.
  4. Now try it! – You may find you prefer a shorter or a longer extraction depending on your preference. When the coffee is under extracted (too quick) it will be sour and too acidic – you’ll feel this in your cheeks. If the shot is over extracted (too slow) it will be bitter, ashy – you’ll feel this in the back of your throat and it will linger.

Finding the sweet spot is part of the fun. Now enjoy experimenting!

Recipe
Dose: 20g
Time: 4m+
Yield: 332ml

You will need
– Cafetiere
– Scales (preferable, but not essential)
– Stirrer
– Filtered water (preferable, but not essential)
– Triple Dare coffee!

Method
The general rule when it comes to the coffee to water ratio with filter brewed coffee is 60g per 1000ml. Now this will vary brew to brew, but it’s a good place to start. For this method I’m going to brew 332ml for 1 person using 20g coffee (approx. 4 leveled tbsp).

  1. Start by heating up your cafetiere with some boiling water. Get your 20g coffee ready – a medium grind works well for cafetiere. Empty the water and add coffee into the brewer.
  2. Now add 332ml of 95c+ water – try and ensure that all of the grounds in the cafetiere get wet. (It’s a common misconception that you can burn coffee if you’re water is too hot – hotter water extracts more from the coffee, so don’t be shy when it comes to temperature! Boiling is fine.)
  3. Now do nothing for 4 minutes. Maybe update yourself with the news. Or meditate. Or, I don’t know, do a few laps of your garden to get pumped for your morning brew.
  4. Now after 4 minutes you’ll see a crust has formed on the top off the coffee – we want to give this a light stir and spoon away any residue. You could drink this coffee now – but leaving it until approx. 10 minutes is only going to make it taste nicer – plus it will then be perfect drinking temperature.
  5. Place the top part of the cafetiere into the vessel – you don’t need to push all the way down, just even so when you pour into a mug the grounds are filtered out.
  6. Enjoy!

Recipe
Dose: 16g
Time: 3m
Yield: 255ml

You will need
– Aeropress
– Filter papers
– Scales (preferable, but not essential)
– Filtered water (preferable, but not essential)
– Stirrer
– Triple Dare coffee!

Method
The mighty, unbreakable, reliable Aeropress. One of our favourite ways to brew. Creates a lovely, rounded, full bodied cup of jo!

We’re going use a ratio of 1:16 coffee to water for this method. A full Aeropress is 255ml so that’s 16g coffee (approx. 3 leveled tbsp ground coffee).

  1. Heat up your mug or server with boiling water.
  2. Turn your Aeropress upside down (this is called the inverted method). We find this method best as you avoid any water dripping through before you’re ready to plunge – this also means that the coffee stays in contact with the water the whole time.
  3. Place your 18g medium ground coffee into the Aeropress and give it a shake to level it out.
  4. Now add approx. 96+c water (boiling is fine) to your Aeropress to fill it (255ml) – stir vigorously making sure every ground of coffee is in contact with the water. Put on the cap and leave for 2 minutes.
  5. At 2 minutes give the Aeropress a swirl – this allows all the grounds that have formed at the top to settle.
  6. At 2m30s flip the Aeropress (carefully holding both parts) onto your drinking vessel and plunge. Try to plunge over 30-40s – this should feel nice and steady and not too hard. Slightly lifting the plunger before pressing down can also ease this – be careful not to pull it out.

If you’re finding too much resistance when plunging, try grinder coarser. If you’re finding it way to easy – grind finer.

Drink and enjoy!

Recipe
Dose: 18g
Time: 3m30s
Yield: 300ml

You will need
– V60
– Filter papers
– Scales (preferable, but not essential)
– Gooseneck kettle (preferable, but not essential)
– Filtered water (preferable, but not essential)
– Triple Dare coffee!

Method
Creating a lighter cup that is full of flavour; the V60 is an experience of it’s own. The bloom, the flow, the draw down; some say brewing a V60 is 5 minutes of meditation. Some say it’s faff. Either way. Let’s do it.

We’re going to be using 18g to 300ml which is a ratio of 1:16 coffee to water. If you don’t have scales 18g is roughly 3.5 leveled tablespoons of ground coffee. We want a medium grind for this method and we’re aiming for approx 3m30s brew time.

  1. Start by placing your filter into the V60 and onto your drinking vessel – rinse thoroughly with boiling water. This should heat up the V60 as well as your cup whilst removing any papery flavour from the filter.
  2. A gooseneck kettle is your best friend when brewing a V60 as it creates a nice thin pour making it easier to be precise. If you don’t have one, no fear, you could use a teapot, a milk jug or a regular kettle – just be careful to not let the water gush and go everywhere.
  3. Place the 18g coffee into the V60 – poke a hole in the middle to make it easier for the water to cover all the grounds. You want your water to be approx 96c – or just 20 seconds off boil.
  4. Pour 50g water to just cover the coffee. This is called the bloom. This enables the coffee to release C02 and prepare for extraction. Try and make sure all of the coffee is covered, lift the v60 and give it a swirl as well as stirring any bubbles away.
  5. At 35s, start to pour water in a circular motion ensuring to cover the coffee evenly throughout – no clumps = good. You want 2/3rds of the total water in by 1minute. With this recipe that means getting 200ml water in by this time. Lift and swirl the V60 along the way to avoid coffee getting stuck the walls of the brewer.
  6. At approx 1m25s you want to slowly pour the remaining water finishing at 300ml at around 2m10s. Now, the water should draw down through the V60 into your cup by 3m30s.

The brew will look something like this:
0:00 – 0:10 – 50g water
0:35 – 1:00 – 200g water
1:25 – 1:35 – 260g water
1:45 – 2:00 – 300g water
2:10 – 3/3:30 – drawdown

If it takes too long, try a coarser grind next time – if it’s too quick, try a finer grind.

Enjoy!

Recipe
Dose: 15g
Time: 3m
Yield: 250ml

You will need
– Kalita
– Wave filter papers
– Scales (preferable, but not essential)
– Gooseneck kettle (preferable, but not essential)
– Filtered water (preferable, but not essential)
– Triple Dare coffee!

Method
The Kalita is a mighty brewer providing more consistency than your average pour over due to the flat bottom design and 3 small holes. This means less chance of channeling, creating an even extraction.

  1. Start by placing your filter into the Kalita and rinsing it with hot water – pour straight into the middle to avoid ruining the wave shape of the filter. Also heat up your decanter/drinking vessel.
  2. Grind your coffee! We want a medium grind for this. Empty your decanter/drinking vessel, place the Kalita on top and coffee in.
  3. Using 96c water (20s off kettle boil) pour 45ml onto the coffee to bloom ensuring to cover all the grounds.
  4. At 45s – continue to pour in the centre of the brewer reaching 150ml by 1m15s.
  5. At 1m45s – continue the rest of the pour reaching 250ml at around 2m15s. Allow for the draw down which should be complete at approx. 3 minutes. Swirl the Kalita during this time to keep the coffee from sticking to the walls.
  6. Drink and have a great day!

If it takes too long, try a coarser grind next time – if it’s too quick, try a finer grind. Also taste the coffee; does it taste balanced and sweet? Is it sour or perhaps bitter? Under extraction (too quick) will produce a sour, acidic, thin cup whilst over extraction (too slow) will produce a bitter cup.

Recipe
Dose: Full basket
Time: Varies
Yield: N/A

You will need
– Moka pot
– Filtered water (preferable, but not essential.)
– Triple Dare coffee!

Method
The beauty of the Moka pot (but also something that some home brewers and baristas alike find baffling) is the lack of precise variables when it comes to brewing. We’re not going to weigh out our coffee or water in this recipe so there’s a bit more flexibility; especially if you don’t have scales.

  1. Start by grinding enough coffee to fill the basket of the Moka pot – we want a medium/fine grind for this recipe – somewhere between espresso and pour over grind size.
  2. Fill your Moka pot basket – no need to tamp, just level out the grounds.
  3. You want to use hot water – this ensures that the water doesn’t have to heat up whilst in the Moka pot and doesn’t have too much contact time with the ground coffee – this can burn the coffee and create an unpleasant flavour.
  4. Pour your hot water into the bottom part of the Moka pot up to just below the valve. Place the coffee basket into the chamber. This will now be hot so be sure to use something like a tea towel to hold the bottom whilst you screw the top section into place.
  5. Place the Moka pot onto your stove – it will now heat up and the pressure will push the water through the coffee and out into the top chamber. Keep the lid up so you can see when this starts to happen.
  6. As is starts to fill and you can hear a bubbling noise – that’s the time to take it off the stove. It’s good to cool your Moka pot down as soon as possible under running cold water – this stops the extraction and avoids over extracting the coffee.
  7. Pour your coffee into your favourite vessel and you’re good to go!

If it takes too long, try a coarser grind next time – if it’s too quick, try a finer grind. Also taste the coffee; does it taste balanced and sweet? Is it sour or perhaps bitter? Under extraction (too quick) will produce a sour, acidic, thin cup whilst over extraction (too slow) will produce a bitter cup.

Tips
Moka pots are often associated with unpleasant/bitter flavour – this is mostly due to the type of coffee that is used and not keeping them clean!

  1. Always use nice, freshly ground specialty grade coffee.
  2. Clean your Moka pot after every use – this means taking it apart completely, including seal and filter section on the bottom of the top half of the Moka pot.
" An island of great coffee amongst an ocean of burnt Lavazza "